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  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr
  • 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr


1939 Lincoln-Zephyr "Scrape" Custom

Lot No. 184

Auctioned on Saturday, June 24, 2017

Estimate: $300,000 - $400,000

  • A legendary and pioneering custom
  • Grounded in the design language of Streamline Moderne
  • Small block Chevrolet 350; three-speed automatic transmission
  • $60,000 in recent mechanical upgrades, including modern wiring harness and new airbag low-rider suspension
  • Recently refinished in black, its creator’s color of choice


As the first custom show car to sit completely flat on the ground with its hydraulics dropped, the 1939 Lincoln-Zephyr “Scrape” has become an icon of the custom car world. The product of a nearly five year collaboration between Hot Rod Magazine editor Terry Cook and custom coach builder Ramsey Mosher, Scrape is a masterful contemporary interpretation of Streamline Moderne and combines design elements of the archetypal Lincoln-Zephyr with modern aesthetics into one truly stunning ride.

Despite the more than 4,500 hours of customizing that the barn-find Lincoln received, the original design language of the Zephyr is still clearly legible and this is no mere coincidence. Terry Cook is a passionate disciple of the original designers of the Zephyr: John Tjaarda, E.T. Gregorie, and Edsel Ford. Further inspiration provided by Figoni et Falaschi, Jacques Saoutchik, and Gordon Buehrig is discernible in nearly every line of Scrape.

The dominant feature of the heavily customized body is a 1941 Zephyr nose which has been grafted onto the 1939 Zephyr rear. It also features frenched 1939 Ford headlights, widened fenders, a custom rear window opening, and a heavily chopped roof. Under the groundbreaking body, Scrape features modern mechanicals including a 1978 Chevrolet frame and running gear and is powered by a small block Chevrolet 350 cubic-inch engine backed by a three-speed automatic transmission. With the Lincoln-Zephyr banjo steering wheel, black and white tuck and roll interior, Cadillac split-bench power seats, air conditioning, power windows, power brakes, and power steering, the result is both beautiful and comfortable.

After its public debut in 1998, Scrape became an international phenomenon. It was the feature attraction of more than twenty premier car shows in the United States and Canada, including the Concours at Meadowbrook, the Louis Vuitton Classic in Manhattan, and SEMA and was also featured on the cover of the November 1998 issue of Street Rodder magazine. Scrape’s pioneering streamlined design and stance proved so popular that Mattel created a sold-out run of 1/18-scale Hot Wheels toys commemorating the car. This uncommon honor further cemented Scrape’s status as arguably the most influential show car of the period.

Once referred to as a “Bo Derek, a Big 10” by the King of the Kustomizers himself, George Barris, the pioneering Scrape recently completed a 3,500-mile shakedown cruise after receiving some $60,000 in mechanical work, and is now ready to leave its mark wherever it goes.


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